Tuesday, January 12, 2021 at 12:00 to 01:30 PM

The Prenatal to Five Impact Collaborative is a peer group focused on learning together about the needs of pregnant women and families with children up to age 5 and how to best support them. This meeting will discuss advocacy and the roles philanthropy can play in systems change work. We’ll be hearing from Sara Watson who authored the Bainum Family Foundation Brief: “Creating Change Through Policy Advocacy”. We’ll also be hearing from Beth Morrow and Laura Weeldreyer about Maryland Family Network’s Early Childhood legislative priorities.

Tuesday, October 06, 2020 at 12:00 to 01:30 PM

Please join the Prenatal to Five Impact Collaborative for their second meeting to learn about Maryland State Department of Education’s Prenatal to Eight Strategic Plan and about the three year grant from Pritzker Foundation for Prenatal-to-Three efforts statewide and what role there is for private philanthropy in those efforts.

Tuesday, August 04, 2020 at 12:00 to 01:30 PM

Maryland Philanthropy Network is pleased to announce the formation of the Prenatal to Five Impact Collaborative (PN-5 Impact Collaborative). This group is for funders interested in learning together about the needs of pregnant women and families with children up to age 5 and how to best support them.

Thursday, July 16, 2020 at 09:00 to 10:30 AM

Join us for a conversation that will discuss the Baltimore Education Research Consortium (BERC)’s decade long study of post-secondary educational and workforce outcomes of Baltimore City high school graduates and the recent publication of the Baltimore College Fact Book. The conversation will also focus on the work of BERC over the last 14 years and opportunities for continued impact with the recent expansion of the consortium to include 10 new Maryland colleges and universities.

Wednesday, July 10, 2019 at 12:00 to 01:30 PM

Maternal and child health outcomes are determined by a complex series of social and environmental factors. As well, disparities in maternal and child health outcomes exist along racial and socioeconomic lines.

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